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R Interview Questions

Last Updated: Jan 02, 2024

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R is a programming language and software environment for statistical computing and graphics. It is widely used among statisticians and data miners for developing statistical software and data analysis. It is an open-source programming language and has a wide range of applications in different fields such as finance, medicine, marketing, and many more. R has a large community of users and developers who contribute to its development, making it one of the most widely-used programming languages for data analysis.

In this article, we have compiled a list of commonly asked R interview questions to help you prepare for your next job interview. These questions cover various topics such as data manipulation, data visualization, machine learning, and more. By going through these questions and their answers, you will gain a better understanding of R and its capabilities, as well as improve your problem-solving skills and technical knowledge. So, let's dive in and explore these R interview questions!

R Interview Questions for Freshers

1. What is R (programming Language)?

R is an open-source programming language that is commonly utilized for statistical analysis and data processing. It is known for its command-line interface and can be run on various platforms such as Windows, Linux, and macOS. R is considered a cutting-edge tool in the field of data analysis and statistics.

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2. What are the main features of R?

  1. R is a powerful and widely-used programming language for statistical computing and data analysis.
  2. It has a large and active user community, with a vast array of available packages and libraries for a wide range of applications.
  3. R is open-source, meaning it is freely available for possible modification and redistribution.
  4. It has a highly expressive syntax and a rich set of built-in functions and data types.
  5. R is designed for handling large amounts of data and can handle both structured and unstructured data.
  6. It has strong support for data visualization, with a variety of tools and libraries for creating high-quality graphics and charts.
  7. R integrates seamlessly with other popular tools and technologies, such as SQL, Hadoop, and Python.
  8. It has robust support for statistical modelling, machine learning, and other advanced data analysis techniques.
  9. R is actively developed and maintained by a team of dedicated contributors and volunteers, ensuring that it remains a cutting-edge tool for data science.

3. What is the difference between R and other programming languages?

  1. R is specifically designed for data analysis and processing, whereas other programming languages like Python, Java, and C++ have a more general-purpose usage.
  2. R has a wide range of built-in statistical and graphical techniques, making it a powerful tool for data exploration and visualization. Other programming languages may require additional libraries or packages to perform similar functions.
  3. R has a large and active community of users and developers who contribute to its development, which results in regular updates and improvements to the language.
  4. R syntax is relatively simple and easy to learn, making it accessible to people with little or no programming experience.
  5. R is widely used in the field of statistics, data science, and research, while other programming languages have a broader range of applications.
  6. R is an open-source programming language, which means that it is free to use and distribute, and users can access the source code and make modifications as per their needs.
  7. R has a vast library of packages that are developed by the community and are available for the users to use, which makes it more flexible and efficient for certain tasks.
  8. R supports functional programming, which is a powerful programming paradigm, making it suitable for performing complex tasks.
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4. Can you explain the basics of R programming syntax?

The basics of R programming syntax include:

  1. Comments: Comments in R are denoted by the pound sign (#), and are used to provide explanations or notes about the code.
  2. Variable assignment: Variables in R are assigned using the assignment operator (=). For example, x = 3 assigns the value 3 to the variable x.
  3. Basic data types: R has several basic data types, including numeric (integer and decimal), character (string), logical (true/false), and NULL (no value).
  4. Operators: R has a variety of operators that can be used to perform mathematical and logical operations on variables, such as + (addition), - (subtraction), * (multiplication), and %in% (membership).
  5. Functions: Functions in R are used to perform specific operations or calculations on data, and can be created and customized by the user.
  6. Packages: R has a large number of packages that provide additional functionality and data, and can be installed and loaded into the R environment.
  7. Control structures: R has control structures that allow for the creation of conditional and looping statements, such as if/else and for loops.
  8. Input/output: R can read and write data from various sources, including files and databases, and can also output results in various formats.

5. How can you create variables and assign values in R?

There are several ways to create variables and assign values in R. Some common ways include:

  • Using the assignment operator "<-" to assign a value to a variable name:
# create a variable called "x" and assign it the value 5
x <- 5
  • Using the "=" sign to assign a value to a variable name:
# create a variable called "y" and assign it the value 10
y = 10
  • Using the "<<-" operator to assign a value to a variable that exists in the global environment:
# create a variable called "z" in the global environment and assign it the value 15
z <<- 15
  • Using the "assign()" function to assign a value to a variable name:
# create a variable called "a" and assign it the value 20
assign("a", 20)

Note that in all of these examples, the variable name should not contain any spaces or special characters, and should start with a letter.

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6. Can you explain the different data types in R and how to handle them?

In R, there are different data types that can be used to store and manipulate data. These data types include:

  1. Numeric: Numeric data types store numbers, either integers or floating-point values. These data types are used for numerical calculations and are typically stored in memory as binary digits.
  2. Character: Character data types store text values, such as strings of letters, numbers, and symbols. These data types are often used to store text data and are stored in memory as characters.
  3. Factor: Factor data types are used to store categorical data, such as gender, country, or product type. Factors are typically stored as integer values in memory, with each unique category assigned a corresponding integer value.
  4. Logical: Logical data types store boolean values, either TRUE or FALSE. These data types are typically used in conditional statements to evaluate whether a certain condition is met.

To handle these data types in R, you can use various functions and operators. For example, you can use the as.numeric() function to convert a character or factor value to a numeric data type, or you can use the is.factor() function to check if a variable is a factor data type. Additionally, you can use logical operators, such as "&" and "|", to evaluate conditions and return boolean values.

7. How can you import and export data in R?

Data can be imported and exported in R using the read.table() and write.table() functions, respectively.

To import data from a file, use the read.table() function with the file path and the delimiter of the data as arguments. For example:

data <- read.table("data.txt", sep=",")

To export data to a file, use the write.table() function with the data object, the file path, and the delimiter as arguments. For example:

write.table(data, "data.txt", sep=",")

Alternatively, data can also be imported and exported using other functions such as read.csv() and write.csv() for CSV files, read.xlsx() and write.xlsx() for Excel files, and read.sav() and write.sav() for SPSS files.

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8. Explain the concept of data frames in R?

A data frame in R is a table-like data structure that contains multiple variables of different data types in the same row. It is a two-dimensional data structure that allows for easy manipulation and analysis of data. Each variable in a data frame is represented as a column, and each row contains a record of the observations for each variable. Data frames are a fundamental data type in R, and are commonly used for working with large datasets. They can be created from various sources, including CSV files, databases, and other data structures, and can be easily manipulated and transformed using various R functions.

Example - Consider the below table

Student ID Name Quiz 1 Quiz 2 Midterm Final
1001 Alice 85 92 89 93
1002 Bob 78 84 80 87
1003 Charlie 92 88 91 90
1004 David 80 77 85 82

In this table, each row represents a student, and each column represents a type of assessment. The columns include Quiz 1, Quiz 2, Midterm, and Final. The values in each cell represent the score that each student received on the corresponding assessment.

For example, Alice received a score of 85 on Quiz 1, a score of 92 on Quiz 2, a score of 89 on the Midterm, and a score of 93 on the Final.

To create this data frame, The R Code -

# Create a data frame
my_data <- data.frame(
  "Student ID" = c(1001, 1002, 1003, 1004),
  "Name" = c("Alice", "Bob", "Charlie", "David"),
  "Quiz 1" = c(85, 78, 92, 80),
  "Quiz 2" = c(92, 84, 88, 77),
  "Midterm" = c(89, 80, 91, 85),
  "Final" = c(93, 87, 90, 82)
)

# Print the data frame
print(my_data)

9. How can you perform basic statistical analysis in R?

To perform basic statistical analysis in R, follow these steps:

  • Install and load the necessary packages. For example, to perform basic descriptive statistics, you can use the "psych" package. To install and load it, run the following code:
install.packages("psych")
library(psych)
  • Import or create the data you want to analyze. You can import data from a file or create it manually by entering the values in a vector. For example, to create a vector of 10 random numbers, you can use the rnorm() function:
data <- rnorm(10)
  • Use the appropriate function to perform the statistical analysis. For example, to calculate the mean of the data, you can use the mean() function:
mean(data)
  • To visualize the data, use the appropriate plotting function. For example, to create a histogram of the data, you can use the hist() function:
hist(data)
  • To perform more advanced statistical analysis, you can use additional functions from the packages or from other packages. For example, to perform a t-test, you can use the t.test() function:
t.test(data)

10. What are the different data visualization techniques in R?

There are several data visualization techniques in R, including:

  1. Bar plots: for comparing categorical data
  2. Histograms: for visualizing the distribution of numeric data
  3. Scatter plots: for showing the relationship between two numeric variables
  4. Line plots: for visualizing the trend of a numeric variable over time
  5. Box plots: for displaying the range and quartiles of numeric data
  6. Bubble plots: for visualizing three-dimensional data
  7. Heatmaps: for visualizing the intensity of data across two dimensions
  8. Pie charts: for displaying proportions of a whole
  9. Network diagrams: for showing relationships between elements in a network
  10. Sankey diagrams: for showing flows between elements in a system.

11. Explain the concept of packages in R and how to use them?

In R, a package is a collection of functions, data, and documentation that extends the capabilities of base R. Packages are created and maintained by members of the R community and provide a way to easily share code and data. To use a package in R, you first need to install it using the install.packages() function. For example, to install the dplyr package, you would run the following code:

install.packages("dplyr")

Once a package is installed, you can use it in your R code by using the library() function to load it. For example, to use the dplyr package, you would run the following code:

library(dplyr)

After loading the package, you can use any of the functions, data, or documentation included in the package. Some packages include many different functions and can be used to perform a wide range of tasks, while others are designed for a specific purpose and may only include a few functions.

12. What are the different control structures in R and how to use them?

In R, there are several types of control structures that you can use to control the flow of execution in your code. These control structures include:

  1. if statements: There are used to execute a certain block of code only if a certain condition is met.
  2. for loops: There are used to repeat a block of code a specific number of times.
  3. while loops: These are used to repeat a block of code while a certain condition is true.
  4. repeat loops: These are similar to while loops but do not have a stopping condition, so they will continue to repeat the code until they are explicitly stopped.

Here is an example of how you might use these control structures in R:

# If statement example
if (x > 10) {
  # This code will only be executed if x is greater than 10
  print("x is greater than 10")
}

# For loop example
for (i in 1:10) {
  # This code will be executed 10 times, with i taking on the values 1 through 10
  print(i)
}

# While loop example
while (x < 100) {
  # This code will be executed repeatedly as long as x is less than 100
  x <- x + 1
  print(x)
}

# Repeat loop example
repeat {
  # This code will be executed repeatedly until the loop is explicitly stopped
  x <- x + 1
  print(x)

  # Stop the loop if x becomes greater than 100
  if (x > 100) {
    break
  }
}

In general, it's important to use control structures like these in your code to make it more readable and easier to understand. They also help you avoid writing repetitive code, which can make your code more efficient and less prone to errors.

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13. Explain the concept of functions in R and how to write them?

In R, a function is a block of code that takes one or more inputs (called arguments), performs a set of operations on those inputs, and returns one or more outputs (called return values). Functions are useful because they allow us to reuse code and avoid repeating the same operations multiple times.

To write a function in R, we use the "function" keyword followed by a pair of parentheses, inside which we specify the input arguments. The body of the function is contained within a pair of curly braces, and within this body, we can perform any operations we want on the input arguments and return the desired output.

Here is an example of a simple function that takes a numeric vector as input and returns the sum of its elements:

# Define the function
sum_vector <- function(x) {
  # Calculate the sum of the vector elements
  sum_x <- sum(x)
  
  # Return the sum
  return(sum_x)
}

# Call the function with a sample vector

v = c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
sum_vector(v)

The function first calculates the sum of the elements in the input vector using the "sum()" function, and then returns this value using the "return()" function. When we call the function with a sample vector, it will output the sum of the vector elements.

14. Explain the concept of object-oriented programming in R?

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm that revolves around the concept of "objects", which are self-contained units of data and functionality. In OOP, objects are created from user-defined classes, which act as templates that define the properties and behaviours of objects.

In R, OOP is implemented through the use of the S3 and S4 classes. S3 classes are the simplest and most commonly used in R, and consist of a set of attributes and methods that define the object's characteristics and behaviour. S4 classes, on the other hand, are more complex and provide more control over object behaviour and inheritance.

OOP in R allows for the creation of more organized and modular code, as well as the ability to reuse and extend existing classes and objects. It also enables the use of polymorphism, which allows objects of different classes to be treated similarly, allowing for more flexible and dynamic code.

15. What are the different classes in R and how to create them?

There are several classes in R, including:

  • Numeric: This class includes numbers, such as integers and floating point values. To create a numeric class in R, you can use the "as.numeric()" function. For example:
my_numeric_value <- as.numeric(2)
  • Character: This class includes strings or text values. To create a character class in R, you can use the "as.character()" function. For example:
my_character_value <- as.character("Hello World")
  • Factor: This class includes categorical data that can be grouped into levels or categories. To create a factor class in R, you can use the "factor()" function. For example:
my_factor_value <- factor(c("A", "B", "A", "C", "B"))
  • Date: This class includes the date and time values. To create a date class in R, you can use the "as.Date()" function. For example:
my_date_value <- as.Date("2022-01-01")
  • List: This class includes a collection of objects of different classes. To create a list class in R, you can use the "list()" function. For example:
my_list_value <- list(1, "Hello", as.Date("2022-01-01"))

16. Explain the concept of exception handling in R?

Exception handling in R refers to the process of catching and handling errors or exceptions that may occur during the execution of a R script. This is important in ensuring that the script does not crash or stop executing due to an unexpected error or exception.

To handle exceptions in R, we use the tryCatch() function which takes a code block as its first argument and one or more error-handling functions as subsequent arguments. These error-handling functions are executed when an error or exception occurs within the code block, allowing us to handle the error in a specific way.

For example, we can use the tryCatch() function to suppress the error message and continue with the execution of the script, or to print a custom error message and exit the script. This allows us to gracefully handle errors and exceptions in our R code, improving the stability and reliability of our scripts.

Certainly! R uses the tryCatch() function for exception handling. Here's an example code that demonstrates the usage of tryCatch():

Let's understand with the help of an example code to understand it better - 

# Define a function that throws an error
my_function <- function(x) {
  if (x < 0) {
    stop("Error: x cannot be negative")
  } else {
    return(sqrt(x))
  }
}

# Call the function with valid input
result1 <- tryCatch({
  my_function(25)
}, error = function(e) {
  print(paste("Caught an exception:", e$message))
})

# Print the result
print(result1)

# Call the function with invalid input
result2 <- tryCatch({
  my_function(-10)
}, error = function(e) {
  print(paste("Caught an exception:", e$message))
})

# Print the result
print(result2)

In this example, we define a function called my_function() that takes a single input x. If x is negative, the function throws an error using the stop() function. Otherwise, it returns the square root of x.

We then call my_function() twice - once with a valid input of 25, and once with an invalid input of -10. In each case, we wrap the function.

17. Explain the concept of regular expressions in R and how to use them?

Regular expressions, or "regex," are a set of characters and symbols used to match and find patterns in text. In R, regular expressions are typically used with the grep() function to search for specific patterns within a character vector.

To use regular expressions in R, you must first specify the pattern you are searching for using a combination of characters and special symbols. For example, the pattern [0-9] will match any single digit, while [A-Z] will match any uppercase letter.

Once you have specified the pattern, you can use the grep() function to search for that pattern within a character vector. For example, the code grep("[0-9]", c("apple", "banana", "1234")) will return the index positions of the vector where the pattern is found, in this case returning 3.

Regular expressions can also include special symbols such as ^ to match the start of a string, $ to match the end of a string, and .* to match any characters in between. These symbols can be combined to create more complex patterns, allowing for more precise searches within a character vector.

18. Explain the concept of time series analysis in R?

Time series analysis is a statistical method used to analyze and model the patterns and trends of data over time. This is typically used to forecast future values based on past data. 

In R, time series analysis involves using functions and packages such as ts(), decompose(), and forecast() to manipulate and analyze time series data. This can include operations such as smoothing, filtering, and decomposition to better understand the underlying patterns and trends in the data. Time series analysis in R also often involves visualizing the data using plots and graphs to better understand the trends and patterns.

19. What is Shiny in R and how to use it for web development?

Shiny is a web application framework for the R programming language. It allows users to create interactive web applications using R without needing to know any web development languages like HTML, CSS, or JavaScript.

To use Shiny for web development, you first need to install the Shiny package in R. Once installed, you can use Shiny's functions and templates to create a web application. This typically involves writing R code to define the layout and functionality of the application, as well as any necessary data or visualizations.

Once the application is complete, you can run it locally on your computer or deploy it to a Shiny server to make it available to others. Users can then access the application through a web browser and interact with it using the controls and features you have defined.

Shiny is a powerful tool for creating interactive web applications using R and can be used for a wide range of purposes, including data analysis, visualization, and machine learning.

20. Write a function in R to calculate the mean of a given vector of numbers.

To calculate the mean of a given vector of numbers in R, we can use the mean() function from the base R package.

The syntax for the mean() function is as follows:

mean(x, na.rm = FALSE, trim = 0, ...)

where x is the input vector of numbers, na.rm is a logical value indicating whether to remove missing values (NA) from the calculation, trim is the proportion of observations to trim from each end of the vector before calculating the mean, and ... are additional arguments.

Here is an example of how to use the mean() function to calculate the mean of a vector of numbers:

# create a vector of numbers
x <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

# calculate the mean of the vector
mean(x)

The output of this code is 3, which is the mean of the vector x (i.e. the sum of the elements divided by the number of elements).

In this example, we did not specify the na.rm and trim arguments, so the default values of FALSE and 0 were used, respectively. This means that no missing values were removed from the calculation, and no observations were trimmed from the vector before calculating the mean.

We can also use the mean() function to calculate the mean of a vector with missing values, by setting the na.rm argument to TRUE:

# create a vector of numbers with missing values
x <- c(1, 2, 3, NA, 5)

# calculate the mean of the vector, ignoring missing values
mean(x, na.rm = TRUE)

The output of this code is 2.8, which is the mean of the non-missing values in the vector x.

Additionally, we can use the mean() function to calculate the mean of a vector after trimming a certain proportion of observations from each end of the vector:

# create a vector of numbers
x <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

# calculate the mean of the vector after trimming 10% of observations from each end
mean(x, trim = 0.1)

The output of this code is 3.25, which is the mean of the vector x after trimming the first and last elements (i.e. the first and last 10% of observations).

In summary, the mean() function is a useful tool for calculating the mean of a given vector of numbers in R. It allows us to easily remove missing values and trim observations from the calculation, making it a versatile and convenient way to calculate means in R.

21. Write a function in R to create a scatter plot of two given vectors of numeric data?

The function below creates a scatter plot of two given vectors of numeric data. It takes in two arguments: x and y, which are the vectors containing the numeric data for the x-axis and y-axis, respectively.

scatter_plot <- function(x, y) {
  # Create the scatter plot using the plot() function
  plot(x, y, main = "Scatter Plot", xlab = "x-axis data", ylab = "y-axis data", pch = 16)
  
  # Add a regression line to the plot using the abline() function
  abline(lm(y ~ x), col = "red")
  }

To use the function, we simply pass in the vectors containing the numeric data for the x-axis and y-axis as arguments. For example, to create a scatter plot of the vectors x and y, we would call the function as follows:

x <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
y <- c(1, 4, 9, 16, 25)

scatter_plot(x, y)

The resulting scatter plot would show the relationship between the values in the x and y vectors, with a red regression line added to the plot to show the overall trend of the data.

22. Write a function in R to create a histogram of a given vector of numeric data?

To create a histogram of a given vector of numeric data in R, we can use the hist() function. This function takes in the vector of numeric data as the first argument, and can also take in optional arguments such as the number of bins to use in the histogram, the color and fill of the bars, and labels for the x and y axes.

For example, to create a histogram of the vector x with 10 bins, filled with the color "red", and labeled axes, we can use the following code:

hist(x,
    breaks = 10,
    col = "red",
    xlab = "X values",
    ylab = "Frequency")

This will create a histogram with 10 bins, where each bin represents a range of values in the vector x, and the height of the bar in each bin represents the number of values in that range. The histogram will be filled with the color "red", and the x and y axes will be labeled with the provided labels.

Alternatively, we can specify the bin edges directly using the breaks argument, rather than specifying the number of bins. For example, to create a histogram with the same x axis labels but with custom bin edges, we can use the following code:

hist(x,
    breaks = c(0, 5, 10, 15, 20),
    col = "red",
    xlab = "X values",
    ylab = "Frequency")

This will create a histogram with 4 bins, where the first bin represents values in the range 0 to 5, the second bin represents values in the range 5 to 10, and so on. The histogram will again be filled with the color "red", and the x and y axes will be labeled with the provided labels.

Overall, the hist() function is a useful tool for visualizing the distribution of numeric data in a vector, and can be customized with various arguments to suit the specific needs of the data.

23. Write a function in R to generate random numbers from a specified distribution?

To generate random numbers from a specified distribution in R, we can use the r function from the stats package. This function takes the name of the distribution as its first argument, followed by any necessary parameters for that distribution.

For example, to generate random numbers from a normal distribution with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1, we can use the following code:

# Load the stats package
library(stats)

# Generate 10 random numbers from a normal distribution
random_numbers <- rnorm(n = 10, mean = 0, sd = 1)

# Print the random numbers
print(random_numbers)

In this code, we use the rnorm function from the stats package to generate 10 random numbers from a normal distribution with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 1. We then print the resulting random numbers to the console.

Alternatively, we can use the sample function from the base R package to generate random numbers from a specified distribution. This function takes a vector of values as its first argument, followed by the number of samples to generate and any necessary parameters for the distribution.

For example, to generate 10 random numbers from a uniform distribution between 0 and 1, we can use the following code:

# Load the base R package
library(base)

# Generate 10 random numbers from a uniform distribution
random_numbers <- sample(x = 0:1, size = 10, replace = TRUE, prob = NULL)

# Print the random numbers
print(random_numbers)

In this code, we use the sample function to generate 10 random numbers from a uniform distribution between 0 and 1. We specify the range of values to sample from using the x argument, and the number of samples to generate using the size argument. We set the replace and prob arguments to their default values to use a simple uniform distribution. We then print the resulting random numbers to the console.

24. Write a function in R to calculate the standard deviation of a given vector of numbers?

To calculate the standard deviation of a vector of numbers in R, we can use the built-in function sd(). This function takes a vector of numbers as input and returns the standard deviation of the numbers in the vector.

Here is an example of how to use this function:

# Create a vector of numbers
numbers <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

# Calculate the standard deviation of the numbers
sd(numbers)

This code creates a vector of numbers and then calculates the standard deviation of those numbers using the sd() function. The result of this calculation is printed on the screen.

The standard deviation is a measure of how much the numbers in a vector differ from the mean of the numbers. It is calculated by taking the square root of the sum of the squares of the differences between each number and the mean, divided by the number of numbers in the vector. This allows us to see how far the numbers are spread out from the mean and can help us identify any outliers or unusual values in the data.

The sd() function in R is a convenient and easy way to calculate the standard deviation of a vector of numbers. It can be used in a variety of data analysis and statistical modelling tasks and can be combined with other functions and tools in R to perform more complex analyses and calculations.

25. Write a function in R to compute the correlation between two given vectors of numeric data?

The function below will compute the correlation between two given vectors of numeric data in R.

correlation_vectors <- function(vector1, vector2) {
  # Compute the correlation between the two vectors
  result <- cor(vector1, vector2)
  
  # Return the result
  return(result)
}

To use this function, simply pass in the two vectors as arguments when calling the function, like so:

vector1 <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
vector2 <- c(5, 4, 3, 2, 1)

correlation_vectors(vector1, vector2)

This will compute the correlation between the two vectors and return the result. In this example, the result will be -1, indicating a perfect negative correlation between the two vectors.

26. Write a function in R to create a bar plot of a given vector of categorical data?

To create a bar plot of a given vector of categorical data in R, we can use the function barplot(). The function takes the vector as an input and creates a bar plot showing the frequency of each category in the vector.

Here is an example of how to use the barplot() function in R:

# Create a vector of categorical data
data <- c("cat", "dog", "bird", "cat", "dog", "bird", "bird")

# Create a bar plot of the vector
barplot(data)

In this example, the barplot() function creates a bar plot showing the frequency of each category in the vector. The plot shows that there are two "cat" values, two "dog" values, and three "bird" values in the vector.

We can also customize the bar plot by adding labels, changing the colors of the bars, and changing the width of the bars. Here is an example of how to customize the bar plot:

# Create a vector of categorical data
data <- c("cat", "dog", "bird", "cat", "dog", "bird", "bird")

# Create a bar plot of the vector
barplot(data,
        main = "Frequency of Animal Types",  # Add a title to the plot
        xlab = "Animal Type",  # Add a label for the x-axis
        ylab = "Frequency",  # Add a label for the y-axis
        col = c("red", "blue", "green"),  # Change the colors of the bars
        width = 0.5)  # Change the width of the bars

In this example, the barplot() function creates a bar plot with customized labels, colors, and bar widths. The plot shows the frequency of each category in the vector and provides clear labels for the axes and the bars.

27. Write a function in R to calculate the covariance between two given vectors of numeric data?

To calculate the covariance between two vectors of numeric data in R, we can use the cov function from the stats package.

The cov function takes two arguments: the first is the first vector of numeric data and the second is the second vector of numeric data.

Here is an example of using the cov function to calculate the covariance between two vectors of numeric data:

# Load the stats package
library(stats)

# Define the first vector of numeric data
vec1 <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

# Define the second vector of numeric data
vec2 <- c(10, 20, 30, 40, 50)

# Calculate the covariance between the two vectors
cov(vec1, vec2)

The output of this code will be the covariance between the two vectors.

The covariance is a measure of how two variables are related. A positive covariance indicates that the two variables are positively correlated, while a negative covariance indicates that the two variables are negatively correlated. A covariance of zero indicates that the two variables are independent.

In this example, the covariance between the two vectors is likely to be positive, since both vectors are increasing in the same direction. This indicates that there is a positive relationship between the two variables represented by the vectors.

28. Write a function in R to impute missing values in a given data frame?

The following function imputes missing values in a given data frame by replacing the missing values with the mean of the non-missing values in the column:

# Function to impute missing values
impute_missing <- function(data) {
  
  # Loop through each column in the data frame
  for(col in colnames(data)) {
    
    # Calculate the mean of the non-missing values in the column
    col_mean <- mean(data[,col], na.rm = TRUE)
    
    # Replace missing values in the column with the calculated mean
    data[is.na(data[,col]), col] <- col_mean
  }
  
  # Return the updated data frame with imputed missing values
  return(data)
}

To use the function, simply pass in the data frame as an argument:
# Impute missing values in the data frame
imputed_data <- impute_missing(data)

The function will replace the missing values in the data frame with the mean of the non-missing values in each column. This method of imputing missing values is useful when there are relatively few missing values in the data and the distribution of the values in the column is approximately normal.

R Interview Questions for Experienced

1. What are the different R libraries and frameworks for data analysis and machine learning?

Some popular R libraries and frameworks for data analysis and machine learning include:

  1. Tidyverse: A collection of R packages for data manipulation, exploration, visualization, and analysis.
  2. caret: A library for training and evaluating machine learning models in R.
  3. ggplot2: A powerful data visualization package for creating high-quality graphics and charts.
  4. dplyr: A package for data manipulation, including filtering, summarizing, and transforming data.
  5. data.table: A library for fast and efficient data manipulation and analysis.
  6. randomForest: A package for building and evaluating decision trees and random forest models.
  7. tidyr: A package for organizing data into tidy data frames, making it easier to manipulate and analyze.
  8. plyr: A package for splitting, applying, and combining data in a variety of ways.
  9. Rpart: A package for building and evaluating decision tree models.
  10. glmnet: A library for fitting regularized generalized linear models, including LASSO and elastic net regression.

2. Explain the concept of parallel processing in R and how to use it?

Parallel processing in R is the ability to perform multiple calculations or operations simultaneously on multiple cores or processors within a computer. This can significantly improve the speed and efficiency of certain types of calculations, particularly when working with large datasets.

To use parallel processing in R, the first step is to install the package "parallel" and load it into the current R session. Then, the user can specify the number of cores or processors to use for the parallel calculations using the "detectCores()" function.

Next, the user can use the "parLapply()" function to apply a given function to a list of inputs in parallel, or the "parSapply()" function to apply a given function to a vector of inputs in parallel. These functions take the same arguments as their non-parallel counterparts, "lapply()" and "sapply()", but also require the specification of the number of cores to use.

For example, to calculate the mean of a large vector of values in parallel using 4 cores, the code would be:

library(parallel)

num_cores <- detectCores()

mean_parallel <- parSapply(num_cores, my_vector, mean)

In this example, the mean of the vector is calculated simultaneously on 4 cores, and the results are combined and returned as a single value.

3. What are the different R packages for data cleaning and preprocessing?

Some of the common R packages for data cleaning and preprocessing are:

  1. dplyr: It is a popular package for data manipulation and cleaning.
  2. tidyr: It is used for reshaping and organizing data.
  3. stringr: It is used for string manipulation tasks such as finding and replacing patterns in text data.
  4. data.table: It is a fast and efficient package for handling large datasets.
  5. lubridate: It is used for working with dates and times in R.
  6. janitor: It is a package for cleaning and tidying up messy data.
  7. readr: It is used for reading and writing text files quickly and efficiently.
  8. caret: It is a package for building machine learning models and preprocessing data for those models.
  9. missForest: It is used for imputing missing values in datasets.
  10. outliers: It is used for identifying and removing outliers from data.

4. What are the different R packages for data visualization and dashboarding?

Some popular R packages for data visualization and dashboarding include:

  1. ggplot2 - for creating static and interactive visualizations
  2. plotly - for creating interactive visualizations and dashboards
  3. shiny - for creating web-based interactive dashboards
  4. DT - for creating interactive tables and data frames
  5. flexdashboard - for creating interactive dashboards with R Markdown
  6. shinydashboard - for creating interactive dashboards with the shiny package
  7. rCharts - for creating interactive visualizations using JavaScript libraries like D3.js and Highcharts.
  8. rbokeh - for creating interactive visualizations using the Bokeh library.
  9. ggvis - for creating interactive visualizations with the Grammar of Graphics.

5. What are the different R packages for data mining and machine learning?

Some popular R packages for data mining and machine learning include:

  1. caret: A comprehensive toolkit for building predictive models in R.
  2. randomForest: An implementation of the random forest algorithm for classification and regression.
  3. e1071: A package for classification and regression based on support vector machines (SVMs).
  4. gbm: An implementation of gradient boosting machine (GBM) for regression and classification.
  5. xgboost: An efficient and scalable implementation of gradient boosting algorithm.
  6. rpart: A package for recursive partitioning and regression trees.
  7. DMwR: A package for data mining with R.
  8. Rattle: A graphical user interface for data mining in R.
  9. Tidymodels: A collection of packages for modeling and machine learning using the tidyverse.
  10. mlbench: A package for benchmarking machine learning algorithms in R.

6. Explain the concept of clustering and classification in R?

Clustering and classification are two closely related techniques used in data mining and machine learning to analyze and understand large datasets.

Clustering is a technique that involves grouping data points into clusters or groups based on their similarity or distance to one another. This allows us to identify patterns and relationships within the data and to understand the underlying structure of the dataset. For example, we may cluster a dataset of customers based on their purchasing behavior, and use this information to create targeted marketing campaigns.

Classification, on the other hand, involves assigning data points to predefined categories or classes based on their characteristics or features. This allows us to predict the class or category that a new data point belongs to based on its features. For example, we may use a classification algorithm to predict whether a customer will make a purchase based on their demographic information and past purchasing behavior.

In R, there are several packages and functions available for performing clustering and classification, including the kmeans() and kmeans() functions for clustering, and the lm() and glm() functions for classification. These functions allow us to easily apply these techniques to our data and to visualize the results.

7. What are the different R packages for text mining and natural language processing?

Some of the popular R packages for text mining and natural language processing are:

  1. tm - for text mining and text analysis
  2. quanteda - for text analysis and natural language processing
  3. tidytext - for text mining and natural language processing using tidy data principles
  4. wordcloud - for creating visualizations of word frequencies in text data
  5. sentimentr - for sentiment analysis of text data
  6. text2vec - for text analysis and natural language processing
  7. tidytext - for text mining and natural language processing using tidy data principles
  8. topicmodels - for topic modeling and document classification
  9. textclean - for text data preprocessing and cleaning.

8. Explain parallel computing in R and how to use it?

Parallel computing in R refers to the ability of the programming language to distribute computational tasks across multiple processors or cores in a computer. This allows for faster and more efficient processing of large datasets and complex algorithms.

To use parallel computing in R, the user first needs to have a computer with multiple processors or cores. They can then use the parallel package in R to create a cluster of workers, which are the individual processors or cores that will be used for parallel computation.

Once the cluster is created, the user can use the parallel version of common R functions, such as lapply and apply, to distribute the computation across the cluster. This can be done by specifying the cluster object as an argument in the function call.

For example, to use parallel computing to apply a function to a large dataset, the user can use the parLapply function, which is the parallel version of lapply, as follows:

cluster <- makeCluster(detectCores()) # create cluster of workers
result <- parLapply(cluster, dataset, myFunction) # distribute computation across cluster
stopCluster(cluster) # stop cluster after computation is done

In this example, the makeCluster function is used to create a cluster of workers using the number of cores detected on the computer. The parLapply function is then used to distribute the computation of the myFunction function on the dataset across the cluster. The result of the computation is stored in the result object, and the cluster is stopped after the computation is complete.

9. Write a function in R to perform linear regression on two given vectors of numeric data?

To perform linear regression on two given vectors of numeric data in R, the following steps can be followed:

  1. Load the required libraries, such as "stats" and "lm".
  2. Define the two given vectors of numeric data as x and y.
  3. Create a linear regression model using the lm() function, where x is the predictor variable and y is the response variable.
  4. Fit the model to the data using the fit() function and store the result in an object called "lm_fit".
  5. Extract the coefficient and intercept values of the linear regression model using the coefficients() and intercept() functions, respectively.
  6. Visualize the linear regression model using a scatterplot with a fitted line, using the plot() function.
  7. Use the summary() function to obtain a summary of the linear regression model, including the R-squared value, which indicates the goodness of fit of the model to the data.

For example:

# Load required libraries
library(stats)
library(lm)

# Define the given vectors of numeric data
x <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
y <- c(2, 3, 5, 7, 9)

# Create a linear regression model
lm_model <- lm(y ~ x)

# Fit the model to the data
lm_fit <- fit(lm_model)

# Extract the coefficient and intercept values
coefficients <- coefficients(lm_fit)
intercept <- intercept(lm_fit)

# Visualize the linear regression model
plot(x, y, col = "blue", main = "Linear Regression Model")
abline(lm_fit, col = "red")

# Obtain a summary of the model
summary(lm_fit)

The output of the above code will be a scatterplot with a fitted red line, indicating the linear regression model, and a summary of the model with the R-squared value.

10. Write a function in R to perform logistic regression on a given data frame?

To perform logistic regression on a given data frame, we can use the "glm()" function in R.

The basic syntax for this function is:

glm(formula, data, family)

where:

  • formula: a symbolic description of the model to be fit. This can be a formula object or a character string of the form "response ~ predictor1 + predictor2 + predictor3 + ...", where "response" is the name of the dependent variable and "predictor1", "predictor2", etc. are the names of the independent variables.
  • data: the data frame containing the data to be used in the model.
  • family: the distribution and link function to be used in the model. For logistic regression, this should be "binomial" with the "logit" link function.

For example, suppose we have a data frame called "mydata" with columns "age", "gender", and "outcome" representing the age, gender, and binary outcome (1 for success, 0 for failure) for each individual. To perform logistic regression on this data, we can use the following code:

model <- glm(outcome ~ age + gender, data = mydata, family = binomial(link = "logit"))

This will fit a logistic regression model to the data, using age and gender as the independent variables and outcome as the dependent variable. The resulting model object can then be used to make predictions, assess model fit, and perform other analyses. 

11. Write a function in R to perform principal component analysis on a given data frame?

To perform principal component analysis on a given data frame in R, we can use the "prcomp" function from the "stats" package. The function takes in the data frame as the input and performs the principal component analysis, providing the output in the form of a list containing the principal component vectors and their corresponding variances.

Here is an example of how to use the "prcomp" function to perform principal component analysis on a given data frame:

# load the stats package
library(stats)

# perform principal component analysis on the data frame
pca_output <- prcomp(data_frame)

# access the principal component vectors and their variances
pca_vectors <- pca_output$rotation
pca_variances <- pca_output$sdev

In this example, the "prcomp" function is used to perform principal component analysis on the data frame stored in the variable "data_frame". The output of the function is stored in the "pca_output" variable, which is a list containing the principal component vectors and their variances. The "pca_vectors" and "pca_variances" variables are then used to access the principal component vectors and their corresponding variances from the "pca_output" list.

The principal component vectors and their variances can then be used for further analysis, such as visualization or dimensionality reduction.

12. Write a function in R to create a boxplot of a given vector of numeric data?

To create a boxplot in R, we can use the boxplot() function. This function takes in a vector of numeric data as its first argument, and creates a box plot visualizing the distribution of the data.

For example, to create a box plot of a vector x containing numeric data, we can write the following code:

boxplot(x)

This will create a box plot showing the distribution of the data in x. The box plot shows the median of the data, as well as the upper and lower quartiles. The "whiskers" on the plot show the minimum and maximum values in the data, and any points outside of the whiskers are considered "outliers" and are plotted separately.

The boxplot() function also has several optional arguments that can be used to customize the plot. For example, we can add labels to the x- and y-axes using the xlab and ylab arguments, respectively:

boxplot(x, xlab="X Values", ylab="Y Values")

We can also change the color of the box plot using the col argument:

boxplot(x, col="red")

Overall, the boxplot() function is a useful tool for quickly visualizing the distribution of numeric data in R.

Conclusion 

In conclusion, the R interview questions discussed in these articles cover a wide range of topics, from basic R programming concepts to advanced data analysis techniques. Aspiring R programmers should be prepared to demonstrate their understanding of the language, as well as their ability to apply it to real-world problems. By familiarizing themselves with the common questions and topics covered in these articles, candidates can increase their chances of success in an R interview.

Interview Resources

R Programming MCQ

1.

What does the “R” in R programming stand for?

2.

What will be the output of the following R code?

x <- c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
y <- c(6, 7, 8, 9, 10)
ifelse(x > 2 & y < 9, “TRUE”, “FALSE”)
3.

What is the number of digits printed by default (options(“digits”))?

4.

What is the function used to create a new object in R?

5.

What does the “tidyverse” package in R include?

6.

What is the command to install a package in R?

7.

What is the function used to summarize the data in R?

8.

What is the function used to create a scatter plot in R?

9.

What is the function used to fit a linear regression model in R?

10.

What is the function used to calculate the mean in R?

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