Practice
Resources
Contests
Online IDE
New
Free Mock
Events New Scaler
Practice
Improve your coding skills with our resources
Contests
Compete in popular contests with top coders
logo
Events
Attend free live masterclass hosted by top tech professionals
New
Scaler
Explore Offerings by SCALER
exit-intent-icon

Download Interview guide PDF

Before you leave, take this LWC Interview Questions interview guide with you.
Get a Free Personalized Career Roadmap
Answer 4 simple questions about you and get a path to a lucrative career
expand-icon Expand in New Tab
/ Interview Guides / LWC Interview Questions

LWC Interview Questions

Last Updated: Jan 02, 2024

Download PDF


Your requested download is ready!
Click here to download.
Certificate included
About the Speaker
What will you Learn?
Register Now

Introduction

LWC (Lightning Web Components) is a modern programming model that is used for building lightning-fast and dynamic web applications on the Salesforce platform. So, if you're looking to grab a job as a Salesforce Lightning Web Components (LWC) developer, then you have come to the right place. LWC is becoming increasingly popular in the Salesforce ecosystem, therefore many organizations are actively looking for skilled LWC developers to join their teams.

To help you prepare for your upcoming interview, we have compiled a list of commonly asked Salesforce LWC Interview Questions and Answers that are frequently asked in LWC Interviews. These questions are designed to test your understanding of the LWC framework, your coding abilities, and your problem-solving skills. By practising these questions and reviewing the answers, you will be able to confidently demonstrate your expertise and increase your chances of cracking the interview.

If you are an experienced Salesforce developer or a fresher, this article will provide you with valuable insights into the world of LWC development and help you prepare for your next interview. So, let's dive in!

LWC Interview Questions for Freshers

1. What is LWC?

LWC is a User Interface (UI) framework used by salesforce developers. It helps developers to construct lightweight, efficient, and reusable components. It utilizes widely accepted web technologies like - HTML, CSS, and JavaScript that result in ease of Maintenance, high performance, and improve code reusability.

The great thing about LWC is that it integrates seamlessly with the Salesforce platform, allowing developers to build custom web applications that can be deployed and managed within the Salesforce environment. This makes LWC an ideal choice for developers who want to create custom solutions for their Salesforce org.

Create a free personalised study plan Create a FREE custom study plan
Get into your dream companies with expert guidance
Get into your dream companies with expert..
Real-Life Problems
Prep for Target Roles
Custom Plan Duration
Flexible Plans

2. What is the difference between Salesforce Lighting and LWC?

Feature Salesforce Lightning LWC (Lightning Web Components)
Purpose It is a User interface framework for the Salesforce platform. It is a Programming model used for building custom web components.
Introduced 2014 2019
Based on It is based on Aura Framework. It is based on Modern web standards (HTML, CSS, and JavaScript).
Key Features It has Customizable page layouts, drag-and-drop components, and improved navigation. It is a Lightweight and modular approach to building web components.
Audience Salesforce administrators and developers Web developers
Use Cases It improves user experience within the Salesforce platform. It is used for building custom web components for use within Salesforce or other web applications.

You can also expect some questions related to salesforce lighting. To understand this please refer to Salesforce Lighting Interview Questions.

3. Explain the lifecycle hooks of an LWC component.

The lifecycle hooks of an LWC component refer to a series of methods that are invoked during the time of component creation, update, and removal from the DOM. These methods provide a way to interact and manipulate the component at different stages of its lifecycle. 

These are divided into four different stages - creation, rendering, updating, and removal. During each stage, the component goes from sets of lifecycle hooks that are used for performing certain actions or updating the properties or state of the component.

  • constructor():  It is the first method that is called when the component is created. And it is used to initialize the component properties and state.
  • connectedCallback(): This method is called when the component is inserted into the DOM. And mostly, this method is used to perform initialization or used to set up event listeners.
  • render(): This method is called whenever the component needs to be rendered or re-rendered. This method returns the HTML markup that can be used to create the component DOM nodes.
  • renderedCallback(): This method is called after the component is rendered or re-rendered. This method can be used to perform additional initialization or update different tasks that need to access DOM.
  • disconnectedCallback(): This method is called when the component is removed from the DOM. This method is useful in cleaning up the resources or removing event listeners.
You can download a PDF version of Lwc Interview Questions.

Download PDF


Your requested download is ready!
Click here to download.

4. What are the benefits of using LWC over traditional JavaScript frameworks?

LWC (Lightning Web Components) has several benefits over traditional JavaScript frameworks. Some of them are - 

  • Modern web standards: LWC is built using modern web standards like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. This makes it easier to get started with LWC development.
  • Lightweight and fast: LWC has a small footprint, which means it can be loaded and executed quickly. This results in faster page load time and a better user experience.
  • Modular architecture: It allows developers to build reusable and maintainable components, this saves a lot of time and effort in the long run.
  • Compatibility with Salesforce: LWC is fully compatible with the Salesforce platform, which allows the building of custom components that integrate easily with Salesforce applications and data.
  • Powerful tools and resources: LWC has a robust set of tools and resources available, (like - a powerful IDE, comprehensive documentation, and an active community of developers), this makes it easier to learn and use LWC, and to get help and support when needed.

5. Explain the concept of data binding in LWC?

Data binding is a core concept in LWC that allows developers to establish a relationship between a component's properties and the values displayed in its HTML template. This relationship ensures that the component's properties are always in sync with the values displayed in the template, and any changes made to one will be automatically reflected in the other.

In LWC, there are two different data binding used -

  • Property binding: It is used to bind a component's property to a value in the HTML template. To do this, we need to use the curly brace syntax ({}) to wrap the property name in the template. For example,  Suppose, there is a property called "message" in the component, then we can bind it to an HTML element like this:
<p>{message}</p>

Whenever the "message" property in the component is changed, the value displayed in the HTML template will be automatically updated to reflect the new value.

  • Event binding: This is used to bind an HTML element's event to a method in the component. To do this, we need to use the on-syntax followed by the event name and the name of the method to be called whenever the event is triggered. For example, Suppose, we have a button in a component and we want to call a method called "handleClick" when it is clicked, then we can bind the event like this:
<button on-click={handleClick}>Click me</button>

Whenever the button is clicked, the "handleClick" method in the component will be called.

Explore InterviewBit’s Exclusive Live Events
Explore Exclusive Events
By
No More Events to show!
No More Events to show!
No More Events to show!
No More Events to show!
Certificate included
About the Speaker
What will you Learn?
Register Now

6. How do you handle user events in LWC?

Suppose we want to handle the user event on a button click and display an alert message, So we can handle this event as - 

  • Define a method in the component's JavaScript file that will handle the button click event. For example, we can define a method called handleButtonClick:
handleButtonClick(event) {
    // Code to handle button click goes here
}
  • Use event binding to associate the handleButtonClick method with the button's click event. In this example, we'll use the onclick attribute to bind the method to the event:
<lightning-button label="Click me" onclick={handleButtonClick}></lightning-button>
  • Inside the handleButtonClick method, you can access information about the event that was triggered using the event parameter. For example, we could display a message when the button is clicked:
handleButtonClick(event) {
    window.alert('Button clicked!');
}

If we can integrate all the code into one component, then the code will be -

<template>
    <lightning-button label="Click me" onclick={handleButtonClick}></lightning-button>
</template>

<script>
    import { LightningElement } from 'lwc';

    export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
        handleButtonClick(event) {
            window.alert('Button clicked!');
        }
    }
</script>

7. What are decorators? List some built-in decorators provided by LWC.

Decorators is a feature in modern JavaScript that allows annotating and modifying or adding some additional functionalities to classes and class members, like - properties and methods. Using decorators in LWC, we can define and modify the behaviour of components.

There are some built-in decorators provided by LWC that we can use to define properties and methods in components:

  • @api: This annotation is used to define a public property that can be accessed by other components.
  • @wire: This annotation is used to connect a component to an Apex method or a wire adapter.
  • @track: This annotation defines a reactive property that causes the component to re-render when the property changes.
  • @trackMap: This annotation defines a reactive map that causes the component to re-render when the map is modified.
  • @trackArray: This annotation defines a reactive array that causes the component to re-render when the array is modified.
  • @apiMethod: This annotation defines a public method that can be called by other components.
  • @wireMethod: This annotation is defined to connect a component to an Apex method or a wire adapter and returns the result as a reactive property.
Start Your Coding Journey With Tracks Start Your Coding Journey With Tracks
Master Data Structures and Algorithms with our Learning Tracks
Master Data Structures and Algorithms
Topic Buckets
Mock Assessments
Reading Material
Earn a Certificate

8. Explain in detail about @api and @track decorators in LWC.

In LWC, both @api and @track decorators are used to define properties in a component, but they serve different purposes.

  • The @api decorator is used to define a public property that can be accessed by other components. This allows passing data between components in a parent-child relationship, or between unrelated components using the Lightning Message Service. Here's an example of how we can use the @api decorator to define a public property:
import { LightningElement, api } from 'lwc';

export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    @api message = 'Hello World';
}

Now the component is defined. Other components can access this property using dot notation, like this:

<c-my-component message="Hello from parent"></c-my-component>
  • The @track decorator is used to define a reactive property, It means suppose there are any changes in the property, then the whole component will be re-rendered. This is useful when we need to update the component's UI based on changes to the property. Here's an example of how we can use the @track decorator to define a reactive property:
import { LightningElement, track } from 'lwc';
export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    @track count = 0;
    handleClick() {
        this.count++;
    }
}

In this example, the count property is defined as a reactive property using the @track decorator. When the handleClick method is called, the count property is incremented and the component re-renders to display the new value.

9. How do you handle user input in LWC forms?

We can handle user input in forms using event handlers and data binding.

  • Event Handlers: LWC provides some built-in event handlers that we can use for handling user inputs, like - onClick, onChange, onSubmit, etc. For example, Suppose we want to handle a button click event, we can define an onClick event handler on the button element like this:
<lightning-button label="Submit" onclick={handleSubmit}></lightning-button>

In the component's JavaScript file, we can define the handleSubmit() method to handle the button click event like this:

handleSubmit(event) {
    // handle the button click event here
}
  • Data Binding: LWC has some data binding features inbuilt that help in binding the value of an input element to a property in the component state. We can use @track which keeps track of the values assigned to the property. And using this, we can handle user input. For example, suppose we need to bind the value of an input element to a property called firstName, then we can use the value attribute like this:
import { LightningElement, track } from 'lwc';

export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    @track firstName = '';

    handleChange(event) {
        this.firstName = event.target.value;
    }
}

The @track decorator is used to define the firstName property as a reactive property that causes the component to re-render whenever its value changes. The handleChange() method is called whenever the user inputs a new value, and it updates the firstName property in the component's state.

10. How can you render multiple templates in LWC?

In LWC, we can display multiple templates conditionally based on the component's state using the if:true directive.

Here's an example of how to display multiple templates in LWC:

<template>
    <template if:true={showTemplate1}>
        <p>This is template 1</p>
    </template>
    <template if:true={showTemplate2}>
        <p>This is template 2</p>
    </template>
</template>

In this example, the if:true directive is used to conditionally render each template based on the component ‘showTemplate1’ and ‘showTemplate2’ properties. When the ‘showTemplate1’ property is true, the first template is rendered, and when the ‘showTemplate2’ property is true, the second template is rendered.

11. Explain ‘ @AuraEnabled(cacheable=true)’ Annotation. Give an example of how you can use it.

In LWC, the @AuraEnabled(cacheable=true) annotation is used to cache the server's response on the client side, making subsequent calls to the same server method faster and more efficient.

When a server method is marked as cacheable, the Lightning Platform stores the method's response in the client's cache. If the same method is called again with the same parameters, the Lightning Platform can retrieve the response from the cache instead of making a new server call. This can improve performance and reduce network traffic.

Consider the below example to use this annotation. 

import { LightningElement, wire } from 'lwc';
import { getRecord } from 'lightning/uiRecordApi';
const FIELDS = ['Account.Name', 'Account.Phone'];
export default class AccountDetails extends LightningElement {
    accountId = '001XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX';

    @wire(getRecord, { recordId: '$accountId', fields: FIELDS })
    account;
    get name() {
        return this.account.data.fields.Name.value;
    }
    get phone() {
        return this.account.data.fields.Phone.value;
    }
}

In this example, the ‘getRecord’ function is marked as cacheable by using the ‘@AuraEnabled(cacheable=true)’ annotation. This means that the response from the ‘getRecord’ function will be cached on the client side, and subsequent calls with the same parameters will retrieve the cached response instead of making a new server call.

12. Can you explain the difference between the component event and the application event in LWC?

Feature Component Event Application Event
Scope Its score is limited to a component hierarchy. It has a Global Scope.
Handling It is handled within the component hierarchy. It is handled by any component that subscribes to the event.
Communication direction Upwards from child to parent. Any direction.
Syntax <c-my-component onmyevent={handleEvent}> <lightning:empApi onmessage={handleEvent}>
Event creation this.dispatchEvent(new CustomEvent('myevent', { detail: 'mydetail' })); const event = $A.get("e.c:myevent"); event.setParams({ myparam: 'myvalue' }); event.fire();
Discover your path to a   Discover your path to a   Successful Tech Career for FREE! Successful Tech Career!
Answer 4 simple questions & get a career plan tailored for you
Answer 4 simple questions & get a career plan tailored for you
Interview Process
CTC & Designation
Projects on the Job
Referral System
Try It Out
2 Lakh+ Roadmaps Created

13. Explain Bounded and Unbounded Expressions in LWC.

In LWC, expressions are used for dynamically displaying the data in the template. There are two types different types of expressions in LWC: 

  • Bounded expressions are enclosed within double curly braces ({{ }}). They are used to display data values in the template that are derived from the component's JavaScript class or HTML attributes. These expressions can also be used to call methods on the component in the JavaScript class.

Let’s understand this through an example - 

<template>
  <p>Hello {{name}}, welcome to my website!</p>
  <p>The result of adding 1 and 2 is {{addNumbers(1, 2)}}.</p>
</template>

Here, {{name}} and {{addNumbers(1, 2)}} are bounded expressions. name is a property defined in the component JavaScript class, and addNumbers is a method defined in the same class.

  • Unbounded expressions are enclosed within single curly braces ({ }). They are used to evaluate JavaScript expressions in the template itself. Unbounded expressions can be used to assign values to HTML attributes or to conditionally render HTML elements.

Let’s understand this also with an example - 

<template>
  <input type="text" value={inputValue}>
  <template if:true={showMessage}>
    <p>The message is: {message}</p>
  </template>
</template>

Here, {inputValue} and {showMessage} is an unbounded expression. Here, we are conditionally rendering the values that use computed inside the tag.

14. What is the role of the Lightning Message Service in LWC?

The Lightning Message Service in LWC provides a way for components to communicate with each other using a publish-subscribe messaging model. It consists of a message channel and message payload, that helps components to send and receive messages in a loosely coupled manner. Components can subscribe to a channel to receive messages and can send messages on a specific channel to any other component that has subscribed to that channel.

For example - Suppose, there is a parent component that has two child components. One child component is responsible for displaying a list of items, while the other child component is responsible for displaying the details of the selected item. When the user selects an item from the list, the first child component can send a message on a specific channel with the details of the selected item. The second child component, which has subscribed to the same channel, can receive the message and update its display with the new details. 

Parent Component

<template>
    <c-item-list onitemselect={handleItemSelect}></c-item-list>
    <c-item-details></c-item-details>
</template>

Child-1 Component

<template>
    <ul>
        <template for:each={items} for:item="item">
            <li key={item.id} onclick={handleItemClick} data-item-id={item.id}>{item.name}</li>
        </template>
    </ul>
</template>

Child-2 Component

<template>
    <div if:true={selectedItem}>
        <h2>{selectedItem.name}</h2>
        <p>{selectedItem.description}</p>
    </div>
    <div if:false={selectedItem}>
        <p>Please select an item from the list.</p>
    </div>
</template>

All these template components, we can initialize into the render() function. So, When the user selects an item from the list in the first child component, the second child component should receive a message containing the details of the selected item and update its display accordingly.

15. Can you explain the role of the Salesforce Object Query Language (SOQL) in LWC?

SOQL is a query language used in Lightning Web Components (LWC) to retrieve data from the Salesforce database. It allows developers to customize the data they retrieve by using filters, ordering, and grouping clauses, and accessing related objects. In LWC, SOQL is frequently used to retrieve data from Salesforce objects and display it in a user interface. The wire adapters and imperative Apex calls in LWC provide developers with ways to make server-side calls to retrieve data using SOQL, offering flexibility and control over query execution. Overall, SOQL enables developers to create dynamic and customized user interfaces in LWC that meet the specific needs of users.

For example - Suppose we need to extract some record with the particular “recordID”, then the code will be -

import { LightningElement, wire } from 'lwc';
import { getRecord } from 'lightning/uiRecordApi';
import ACCOUNT_OBJECT from '@salesforce/schema/Account';
import NAME_FIELD from '@salesforce/schema/Account.Name';

export default class SoqlExample extends LightningElement {
    @wire(getRecord, { recordId: '001xx000003Dk9rAAC', fields: [NAME_FIELD] })
    account;

    get accountName() {
        return this.account.data.fields.Name.value;
    }
}

In this example, we're using the getRecord wire adapter from the lightning/uiRecordApi module to fetch the Name field of an Account record with the ID 001xx000003Dk9rAAC.

The “recordId” parameter is set to the ID of the record we want to fetch, and the fields parameter is set to an array containing the NAME_FIELD constant, which represents the Name field of the Account object.

16. Explain the difference between a getter and a setter in LWC?

  Getter Setter
Function Retrieves the value of a property. Sets the value of a property.
Syntax Defined using the get keyword followed by a property name. Defined using the set keyword followed by a property name.
Usage Accesses the value of a property without modifying it. Modifies the value of a property.
Parameters No parameters. Takes one parameter representing the new value to be assigned to the property.
Return type Returns a value. Does not return a value.
Modifies Does not modify the property. Modifies the property.

LWC Interview Questions for Experienced

1. How do you create a Lightning App that embeds an LWC component?

To get started, first, we need to create the LWC component that we want to embed. We can use the Lightning Web Components Playground or Salesforce CLI to create your component.

Once we have the component,  then we need to create the Lightning App itself. There are a few different tools we can use for this, like using the Salesforce Developer Console or the Salesforce CLI to create your app.

Once the app is created, we can then embed the LWC component (that we have created initially) within it. This involves referencing the component within the app using a specific syntax. We also want to configure the app to ensure that it is set up correctly and that any necessary event handling is in place. We can include the component like this - 

<aura:application extends="force:slds">
    <c:myLwcComponent />
</aura:application>

In the above snippet, we have the component (myLwcComponent). Suppose we need to embed this component in the lightning app. So, here we can use the <c:> syntax used to reference the component within the app.

2. Can you explain how to use the LWC component cache and why it is important for performance?

The LWC component cache is an important feature that can help in improving the performance of Lightning Web Components. Consider the scenario behind the rendering of the component - 

When a user loads a page that contains LWC components, the browser needs to download and render those components. This usually takes some time, especially if the user has a slow internet connection or is accessing the page for the first time. This problem can be solved using the LWC component cache. 

This helps speed up this process by storing copies of the components in the browser's cache. 

So, in the case when the browser does not need to download the components every time the user accesses the page. Instead of this, the cached components can be quickly retrieved and displayed. This helps in reducing page load time and improves the user experience. 

To enable the LWC component cache,  we need to use the @wire decorator with the getRecord or getListUi wire adapters. These adapters automatically cache the results of the wire call in the browser's cache, which can help improve performance.

3. Can you explain how to use the JavaScript Promises in LWC and give an example?

To use Promises in LWC,  First of all, we need to create a new Promise object. This object represents an operation that will be completed at some point in the future. Then we have to use the (then) method to define what should happen when the operation is successful, and the (catch) method to define what should happen if an error occurs.

Let’s understand this with the help of an example - 

import { LightningElement, wire } from 'lwc';
import fetchData from '@salesforce/apex/MyController.fetchData';
export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    data;

    @wire(fetchData)
    fetchData(result) {
        result.then(data => {
            this.data = data;
        })
        .catch(error => {
            console.error(error);
        });
    }
}

In this example, The then method is used to define what should happen when the Promise is successfully resolved. In this case, the data variable is set to the result of the Promise returned value.

The catch method is used to define what will happen if the Promise is rejected due to an error. In this case, the error is logged to the console.

4. How do you use the Salesforce REST API in LWC? What are the best practices for integrating with external systems?

To use the Salesforce REST API in LWC, we can use the built-in fetch method or a third-party library like axios or jQuery. Consider the below example of how we can use the fetch method to make a call to the Salesforce REST API. 

import { LightningElement } from 'lwc';

export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    connectedCallback() {
        const endpoint = '/services/data/v53.0/query?q=SELECT+Name+FROM+Account';
        fetch(endpoint, {
            method: 'GET',
            headers: {
                'Authorization': 'Bearer ' + authToken
            }
        })
        .then(response => {
            return response.json();
        })
        .then(data => {
            console.log(data);
        })
        .catch(error => {
            console.error(error);
        });
    }
}

In this example, the fetch method is used to make a GET request to the Salesforce REST API. The Authorization header is used to include the authentication token required to make the request. The response is then parsed as JSON using the json method, and the resulting data is logged to the console.

5. What are the best practices that you should follow for integrating with external systems?

When integrating with external systems, there are a few best practices we should keep in mind:

  1. Always use secure authentication methods, such as OAuth, to authenticate with external systems.
  2. Use API versioning to ensure that changes to the external system's API don't break the integration.
  3. Use error handling to gracefully handle errors that may occur when making API calls.
  4. Minimize the number of making API calls, and use bulk APIs or batch processing where possible to improve performance.

By following these best practices, we can create robust and reliable integrations with external systems that provide a seamless experience for users.

6. What are the best practices for building reusable LWC components?

Some points mentioned below that we can follow for building reusable LWC Components:

  • Using clear and descriptive naming conventions: We must have to give the LWC components descriptive and meaningful names that accurately reflect their purpose and functionality. This makes it easier for other developers to understand what our component does and how it can be used.
  • Use clear and concise documentation: We must have to provide clear and concise documentation for LWC components, including information on how to use them, any required properties or parameters, and any relevant limitations or known issues.
  • Use CSS best practices: We must have to use best practices for CSS, like - using classes instead of IDs, avoiding global styles, and using consistent naming conventions.
  • Use event-driven architecture: We must use the best event-driven architecture to enable communication between LWC components. This makes it easier to build complex, interconnected components that can be used in a variety of contexts.
  • Use standard design patterns: We must have to use standard design patterns, such as the Single Responsibility Principle (SRP) and Separation of Concerns (SoC), to create components that are easy to understand and modify.
  • Keep components simple and focused: We need to keep the components simple and focused on a single task or functionality. This makes it easier to reuse them in different contexts and avoids unnecessary complexity.

7. Can you explain how to use the Lightning Message Service in LWC and give an example?

To use the Lightning Message Service in LWC, we are required to follow these steps:

  • Define a message channel: A message channel defines the topic or theme of the messages that will be published and subscribed to. We can define a message channel using the “lightning/messageService” module.
import { LightningElement } from 'lwc';
import { createMessageChannel } from 'lightning/messageService';

export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    channelName = 'myChannel';

    connectedCallback() {
        this.channel = createMessageChannel({
            channelName: this.channelName,
            isSubscribe: true
        });
    }
}

In this example, we define a message channel called "myChannel" using the createMessageChannel() method. We also set the isSubscribe parameter to true, which means that this component will be able to subscribe to messages published on this channel.

  • Publish a message: After defining a message channel, we can publish messages on that channel using the publish() method.
import { LightningElement } from 'lwc';
import { createMessageChannel, publish } from 'lightning/messageService';

export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    channelName = 'myChannel';

    handleClick() {
        const message = {
            recordId: '001XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'
        };
        publish(this.channel, message);
    }
}

In this example, we define a method called handleClick() that publishes a message on the "myChannel" message channel. The message contains a recordId property with a hardcoded value.

  • Subscribe to a message: Finally, to receive and act upon messages published on a message channel, we can use the subscribe() method.
import { LightningElement } from 'lwc';
import { createMessageChannel, subscribe } from 'lightning/messageService';

export default class MyComponent extends LightningElement {
    channelName = 'myChannel';

    connectedCallback() {
        this.channel = createMessageChannel({
            channelName: this.channelName,
            isSubscribe: true
        });

        this.subscription = subscribe(
            this.channel,
            message => {
                console.log(message.recordId);
            }
        );
    }

    disconnectedCallback() {
        unsubscribe(this.subscription);
    }
}

In this example, we define a method called connectedCallback() that sets up a subscription to the "myChannel" message channel. When a message is received, the console.log() method is called with the recordId property of the message.

To clean up the subscription when the component is removed from the DOM, we define a disconnectedCallback() method that unsubscribes from the channel.

8. What is the purpose of the Lightning Data Service in LWC?

The purpose of the Lightning Data Service in LWC is to provide a declarative and efficient way to perform CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) operations on Salesforce records. It is a framework-provided service that works as a data layer between the LWC component and the Salesforce database.

The Lightning Data Service provides several benefits for LWC development:

  • Declarative data binding: With the Lightning Data Service, you can declaratively bind your component's UI elements to record data without writing any Apex code or SOQL queries. This simplifies the code and reduces the development time.
  • Caching and automatic record updates: The Lightning Data Service caches record data locally on the client side and automatically updates it when changes occur in the database. This improves performance and reduces the number of round trips to the server.
  • Automatic CRUD operations: The Lightning Data Service provides a set of methods to create, read, update, and delete records. These methods are automatically implemented and available for use in your LWC component.
  • Automatic sharing and field-level security: The Lightning Data Service automatically enforces sharing rules and field-level security when reading or modifying records. This ensures that your component's data access adheres to the security settings defined in your Salesforce org.

9. How do you ensure that your LWC components adhere to the accessibility standards and guidelines?

Here are some best practices that we can follow:

  • Use semantic HTML: Use HTML tags that accurately describe the purpose of the content, such as <header>, <nav>, <main>, <article>, <section>, <footer>, etc. This makes the content more meaningful to assistive technologies like screen readers.
  • Add alt text to images: Always include alt text for images and other non-text content so that assistive technologies can describe them to visually impaired users.
  • Use high contrast colors: Ensure that the LWC component has sufficient color contrast between text and background to make it easy to read for users with visual impairments.
  • Use ARIA attributes: Use Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) attributes to provide additional information about the purpose of UI elements, like role, label, and state. This helps assistive technologies to provide more accurate and meaningful descriptions of the UI.
  • Test with assistive technologies: Test the LWC components using screen readers, keyboard navigation, and other assistive technologies to ensure they can be used effectively by users with disabilities.
  • Use the lightning/uiRecordApi module: The lightning/uiRecordApi module includes accessible methods to read and update record fields and handle errors in a more accessible way.
  • Follow the WCAG guidelines: The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) provide a comprehensive set of guidelines for ensuring that web content is accessible. Adhere to the guidelines as much as possible when developing LWC components.

10. What is the role of the Shadow DOM in LWC, and how does it differ from the traditional DOM?

In LWC, the Shadow DOM is used to encapsulate the component's DOM hierarchy and prevent CSS styles and JavaScript code from bleeding out of the component and interfering with the rest of the page.

The Shadow DOM is a part of the web standards and it is supported by modern browsers. It allows the creation of a separate DOM tree inside the component that is hidden from the outside world. This way, the component's styles, and behaviour are self-contained and it doesn't affect other parts of the page.

In contrast to the traditional DOM, which is global and mutable, the Shadow DOM is local and immutable. It isolates the component's styles and behaviour from the rest of the page, making it easier to maintain and test the component in isolation.

When we create an LWC component, its HTML template, and CSS styles are automatically encapsulated in the Shadow DOM. The JavaScript code can access the Shadow DOM via the “this.template” property, but it cannot access the rest of the page's DOM directly.

Conclusion

LWC is a powerful and flexible framework for building modern, lightweight web applications on the Salesforce platform. It offers many benefits, such as better performance, improved developer productivity, and easier integration with external systems. However, mastering LWC requires a deep understanding of its core concepts and best practices, as well as the ability to write clean, modular, and reusable code.

So if you are preparing for an LWC interview, it is essential to have a solid grasp of the framework fundamentals. Additionally, you should be able to demonstrate your experience in designing and building complex LWC components, as well as your ability to debug and troubleshoot issues. By studying and practising these LWC interview questions, you can gain the knowledge and skills you need to excel in your next LWC job interview and make a significant contribution to your team and organization.

LWC MCQ Questions

1.

What does LWC stand for?

2.

Which programming language is used for developing LWC?

3.

What is the purpose of the @api decorator in LWC?

4.

What is the role of the Lightning Data Service in LWC?

5.

What is the difference between LWC and Aura components?

6.

What is the purpose of the @wire decorator in LWC?

7.

Which method is called after a component is inserted into the DOM?

8.

Which method is called after a component's state or properties change?

9.

What is the purpose of the this.template.querySelector() method in LWC?

10.

What is the purpose of the @track decorator in LWC?

11.

Which event is fired when a user clicks a button in an LWC component?

12.

What is the purpose of the dispatchEvent() method in LWC?

13.

Which method is called before a component is removed from the DOM?

14.

Which lifecycle hook is called after a component is removed from the DOM?

15.

Which of the following is a benefit of using the Lightning Data Service in LWC?

Excel at your interview with Masterclasses Know More
Certificate included
What will you Learn?
Free Mock Assessment
Fill up the details for personalised experience.
Phone Number *
OTP will be sent to this number for verification
+91 *
+91
Change Number
Graduation Year *
Graduation Year *
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029
*Enter the expected year of graduation if you're student
Current Employer
Company Name
College you graduated from
College/University Name
Job Title
Job Title
Engineering Leadership
Software Development Engineer (Backend)
Software Development Engineer (Frontend)
Software Development Engineer (Full Stack)
Data Scientist
Android Engineer
iOS Engineer
Devops Engineer
Support Engineer
Research Engineer
Engineering Intern
QA Engineer
Co-founder
SDET
Product Manager
Product Designer
Backend Architect
Program Manager
Release Engineer
Security Leadership
Database Administrator
Data Analyst
Data Engineer
Non Coder
Other
Please verify your phone number
Edit
Resend OTP
By clicking on Start Test, I agree to be contacted by Scaler in the future.
Already have an account? Log in
Free Mock Assessment
Instructions from Interviewbit
Start Test